Pre Law Studies Courses

ADJUS-135 Law and Democracy

3 Units: 54 hours of lecture, per term, LR, DG, CSU, UC

This course will cover the evaluation, debate and critical analysis of law and legal issues that affect us as individuals, families, employees and communities. Students will learn about the practical aspects of civil, criminal, constitutional, family, immigration, and consumer law in a diverse society with an orientation toward involvement in the local community.

ENGL-001A Composition and Reading

4 Units: 72 hours of composition per term, LR, DG, CSU, UC (C-ID: ENGL 100)

Prerequisite: ENGL-142B or ESL-195, or passing Compass score.

This course focuses on composition that develops from examining and comparing writers’ ideas and techniques in classic and contemporary non-fiction from varied cultural perspectives. Through discussion, essay writing and research, the course will further develop the techniques taught in ENGL-142B.

SPCH-141 Argumentation & Debate

3 Units: 54 hours of lecture, per term, SC, DG, CSU, UC

This course provides students with the opportunity to learn about different styles of argumentation and debate. Students will learn how to critically analyze a variety of current event topics and present oral and written arguments on both sides of the issues.

MATH-164 Introduction to Probability and Statistics

4 Units: 72 hours of lecture, per term, LR, DG, CSU, UC (C-ID: MATH 110)

Prerequisite: Math-120 or Math-125

This course introduces the theory of probability and a study of descriptive statistics and statistical inference. Included will be a general study of measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability models, random variables, probability distributions, and hypothesis testing. This is designed to serve as an introductory course in statistics for the student in business, psychology, life sciences and social sciences.

SPCH-121 Critical Thinking and Persuasion

3 Units: 54 hours of lecture, per term, SC, DG, CSU, UC (C-ID: COMM 190)

This course provides students with the opportunity to study the principles of reasoning and their application to the analysis and evaluation of political and marketplace communication. It examines the structure of argument, underlying assumptions, the quality of evidence used to support claims, the use of language, the discovery of formal and informal fallacies, and the effect of print and electronic media on argumentation. The course examines historical and contemporary approaches to persuasive messages. It also focuses on advocacy and the presentation of persuasive appeals, and learning to construct, deliver, and critique persuasive messages. This course emphasizes the integration of critical thinking principles with techniques of effective written and spoken argument.

SPCH-121I Critical Thinking & Persuasion (IGETC)

3 Units: 54 hours of lecture, per term, LR, DG, CSU, UC (C-ID: COMM 190)

Prerequisite: ENGL-001A

This course provides students with the opportunity to study the principles of reasoning and their application to the analysis and evaluation of political and marketplace communication. It examines the structure of argument, underlying assumptions, the quality of evidence used to support claims, the use of language, the discovery of formal and informal fallacies, and the effect of print and electronic media on argumentation. The course examines historical and contemporary approaches to persuasive messages. It also focuses on advocacy and the presentation of persuasive appeals, and learning to construct, deliver, and critique persuasive messages. This course emphasizes the integration of critical thinking principles with techniques of effective written and spoken argument. Meets IGETC requirement for transfer. Essay writing requirement: 6,000-8,000 words.

PHILO-130 Introduction to Critical Thinking

3 Units: 54 hours of lecture, per term, SC, DG, CSU, UC

This course is intended to help students develop means for evaluating the conflicting claims to truth by identifying common fallacies and characteristics of reliable thinking, by practicing analysis of arguments, and by clarifying arguments on both sides of some current issue they wish to examine.

ENGL-001C Critical Thinking and Advanced Composition

3 Units: 54 hours of composition per term, LR, DG, CSU, UC (C-ID: ENGL 105)

Prerequisite: ENGL-001A.

This course is designed to develop critical thinking, reading and writing skills beyond the level of ENGL 001A. Students will develop advanced essay writing skills with emphasis on argumentation and analysis. Varied cultural perspectives and the specialized critical concerns needed to understand, analyze, and evaluate these perspectives will be stressed.

POLSC-125 Government of the United States

3 Units: 54 hours of lecture, per term, SC, DG, CSU, UC (C-ID: POLS 110)

This course examines U.S. Constitution and the U.S. system of government at the national and state levels; the course covers both U.S. and California political processes and institutions. The rights, obligations, and participation of citizens will be discussed. The course will also highlight contemporary relationships of state and local government, rights and liberties established by the U.S. Constitution, including key U.S. Supreme Court cases, the resolution of conflicts and the establishment of cooperative processes under the constitutions of both the state and the nation and the political processes involved. Significant events since the American Revolution and the contributions of women and ethnic groups will also be examined. The cultural diversity of the U.S. and California will be emphasized.

LARAZ-113 Introduction to Analysis of American Political
Institutions

3 Units: 54 hours of lecture, per term, SC, DG, CSU, UC

This course examines the U.S. Constitution and the U.S. system of government at the national and state levels, with an emphasis on Latino political participation. The course covers both U.S. and California political processes, and highlights the relationships between the federal government and state and local governments. It will also survey the resolution of conflicts and the establishment of cooperative mechanisms under the constitutions of both state and federal governments. Included will be the process to achieve resolution. Important events since the American Revolution and contributions of Latinos, women and various ethnic groups will be surveyed. Cultural diversity in California and in the U.S. will be emphasized.

HIST-121 History of United States (1865 – Present)

3 Units: 54 hours of lecture, per term, SC, DG, CSU, UC

This course covers the development of the United States of America after the Civil War. This survey course stresses an understanding of Reconstruction, the growth of big business, and domestic and foreign problems to provide a basis for a comprehensive and intelligent evaluation of current problems. The cultural, social, economic, geographic, diplomatic and political factors involved in the evolution of American society are also analyzed through a variety of chronological reports. The historical development of the following national, ethnic, and racial groups, such as, American Indians, Europeans, Latinos, Africans, and Asians, as well as women, are also examined.

HIST-123 History of African Americans in the United States (1865 to the Present)

3 Units: 54 hours of lecture, per term, SC, DG, CSU, UC

This course covers the period from 1865 to the present. It is a cross cultural study of the African experience in America. The course will examine the geographical migrations of African Americans and their interactions with Native Americans, Latinos, Europeans and Asians. Students will analyze the development of American economic, social, and political institutions, as well as the U.S. Constitution.

HIST-127 History of Latinos in the United States (1846-present)

3 Units: 54 hours of lecture, per term, SC, DG, CSU, UC

This course covers United States history from 1846 to the present with an emphasis on Latinos. The course will cover the Mexican War, Civil War, Great Depression, labor movement history, the Cold War, and the Latino struggle for civil rights. The course will emphasize Latino interactions with African Americans, Native Americans, Europeans, and Asian Americans. Students will analyze the development of American economic, social, and political institutions, as well as the United States constitution.